Small Squares. 1971         [Click to view]

Printed paper on hardboard, cotton strings, 78 x 78 cm

Randomly aligned squares of primary coloured stripes produce a flickering, iridescent effect as the viewer passes the work.

 
Iridum. 1971 [Click to view]

Printed paper on board, cotton strings, 50 x 120 cm

The slight curve of the striped background produces variegating colour effects as the viewer moves past.

 
Dozen. 1971  [Click to view]

Printed paper on hardboard, cotton strings, 50 x 120 cm

Stripes on the twelve groups of concentric squares are arranged in a permutation so that no two are alike. The colours change as the viewer moves past.

 
Num 1. 1971  [Click to view]

Printed paper on board, cotton strings. 66 x 66 cm

One of our first examples of the use of a stepped, striped background that reacts with strings and their shadows to produce subtle iridescent colour changes when viewed from different angles.

 
Bifröst. 1970 [Click to view]

Printed paper on hardboard, cotton strings, 175 x 60 cm

Our first use of printed paper stripes and strings to produce colour changes.

Bifröst is the Norse name for a rainbow - ‘the shimmering path’.

Owned by Bifröst Co-operative College.

Vortex 1. 1970        [Click to view]

4-colour acrylic on wood. 90 x 90 cm

Colours subtly reflect together, merge and multiply. Only four paint colours were actually used in this piece but there appear to be many more.

Perspex 1. 1969      [Click to view]

Painted wood and perspex. 46 x 46 cm

An early example of colours changing by the use of hand painted stripes.

Vortex 2. 1969        [Click to view]

Gouache on paper 45 x 45 cm

A study in additive colour effects. Four flat colours blend optically to give the illusion of many more.

Helix. 1969   [Click to view]

Acrylic on canvas. 125 x 125 cm

Four flat colours begin to blend optically as they approach the centre.

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